Keeping Your House Warm and Heating Costs Low

 In Energy Efficiency, Heating and Cooling

In the Late Fall, as temperatures drop and the sun sets early, heating and lighting costs go up. The thermostat gets cranked higher and higher, lights stay on longer and longer, and the heating and electric bills grow exponentially. However, these problems don’t affect everyone equally. Homes with more windows can provide that extra heat and extra light that makes Fall bearable for your comfort and your wallet; they provide an easy solution for keeping your house warm.

Windows for Colder Weather

The appeal of windows lies in their ability to provide both natural light and cost effective heat. When properly installed, they allow more light into the home and reduce the need for electric lighting. Natural light looks wonderful in any home and can liven up any space. Large, decorative windows open up walls and make rooms feel bigger. Smaller windows are good for accentuating certain features in a room. Any window can provide the light and heat needed to add splendor to your home.

Lenox by Stone Martin Builders

Large, south-facing windows are exposed to the most sun, gathering natural light and heat

Natural lighting is a surefire way to increase the appeal and warmth of your home. The more natural light that enters a room, the easier it is to keep the room heated. The problem, however, is keeping the heat in. There are a few quick fixes for keeping your home nice and toasty during the colder months. Coatings can be applied to the inside of windows to reflect heat back into your home rather than letting it seep outside. Caulking helps to seal gaps around the frames of the window as well as the panes themselves. Additionally, adding storm windows to your existing windows helps to maintain the current inside temperature of any living space. Doors should have weather stripping along the bottom to prevent drafts from coming into the home. Keeping your home “outdoor proof” will help decrease heat lost in no time.

Where You Should Build Your Windows

Buffing up existing windows isn’t the only way to keep the house warm. Placement in the house definitely affects the amount of light capable of coming through. South facing windows provide homes with the greatest natural lighting and highest heat retention. When replacing older windows or installing new ones, consider replacing single pane windows with double paned ones. Double pane windows help to trap additional heat within the home. They are insulated from the outside and make it harder for inside heat to escape; heat inside the house travels slower through a double paned window than a single pane. By increasing the efficiency of the window, in terms of both its heat retention and its location, heating and lighting costs can be reduced.

Energy Efficiency

Thompson J by Stone Martin Builders

A dark colored roof and paint scheme can help absorb more heat, natural increasing the warmth of your home

Newer, energy efficient windows are also a good option. These windows maximize on the transfer of heat into the home and the amount of light let in. Energy efficient windows help to keep the heat in your home and keep bills down, but what are these windows and why are they so useful? They usually incorporate all the aforementioned parts that maximize the efficiency of a window. These windows have a high light transmittance, allowing more light through and providing more heat. Their low conduction also allows less heat to escape back outside; and although these windows generally cost more than their basic counterparts, they are quick to pay for themselves in the money saved on both heating and lighting costs.

Some other exterior solutions to heating problems can be remedied by changing up the color of your house or roofing material. A darker roofing shingle will absorb more heat and trap warm air in your attic. Likewise, darker color paint on the body of the house will allow heat to absorb through the walls and help keep the house warm.

With the coming cold, it is essential to maintain a warm home in the next few months, even though doing so can be an expensive undertaking. However, there are many tricks to fixing and keeping cozy your home that won’t cost an arm and a leg. Following these tips can save you time, money, and hassle, when “coldproofing” your home.

Source:

Energy.gov

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